Thursday, August 11, 2022

Does Psoriasis Cause Muscle Pain

Deformed Hands And Feet

How does Psoriasis affect quality of life? – Dr. Suresh G

The most severe form of PsA is called arthritis mutilans. It causes inflammation that damages the small bones in your hands and feet. Your fingers and toes might become deformed and hard to move. They could also get shorter due to bone loss. This rare form affects fewer than 5% of people with PsA.

As Can The Words Youre Too Young To Have Arthritis

When you say the word arthritis, every older person you meet has it, too, Dishner says. While well-meaning people may sympathize by comparing their own ailment with yours, psoriatic arthritis is a much different form of arthritis and does not develop because of aging. It can occur at any age but typically begins to cause symptoms among those between 30 and 50 years old, according to the NPF.

What A Dermatologist Evaluates

  • Risk for developing other medical conditions
  • Response to past treatments for psoriasis
  • Concerns about how psoriasis affects your life
  • Other medications

Your dermatologist can see the signs of psoriasis during a physical examination of your skin, scalp, and nails, and can take your medical history and symptom history to make an accurate diagnosis.

They will ask you about:

  • Symptoms, such as red bumps or itchy skin
  • Joint problems, such as pain and swelling or stiffness when you wake up
  • Blood relatives who have psoriasis
  • Recent changes in your life, such as an illness or increased stress

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Taking A Look At Inflammation

One source of pain caused by psoriasis is the tissue damage the condition causes, such as cracks . Nerve endings in the skin can be activated in damaged tissue and trigger pain signals in the brain.

The inflammation caused by psoriasis is thought to affect the way that the brain processes pain signals. Researchers are working to learn more about the link between psoriasis and pain, and why some patients experience more pain than other patients with a similar level of disease severity4.

Research has also shown that the experience of pain can be influenced by many factors. For example, patients in warm and sunny climates tend to report less pain. The experience of pain is also affected by issues such as5:

  • Feeling isolated socially and/or at work
  • Negative feelings about the condition and its symptoms

Scientists used to believe that patients with psoriasis could not have the symptoms of itching and pain at the same time because their signals travel along different pathways through the spinal cord to the brain.

Sacroiliac Joint And Back Pain

Psoriatic Arthritis: When it Hurts to Even Think About Moving ...

Psoriatic arthritis is a type of spondyloarthritis, an umbrella term for inflammatory conditions that involve the joints and the entheses, or places where the ligaments and tendons attach to the bones. With these diseases, there is often stiffness, swelling, spine pain , and SI joint pain. For me, my left SI joint causes me a lot of pain when I have a flare.

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Chair Selection Is Important

It can be extremely difficult to get in different types of seats, depending on their height, width, and design, because of pain or stiffness. Luckily, I was a chemistry teacher, so I had lab stools, which were much easier for me, Dishner says. But outside school I would find myself scanning a room to find the right chair.

Alternate Heat And Cold

When your muscles are sore, try alternating hot and cold compresses on the sore areas. Heat helps alleviate pain and tension by loosening the muscles around the joints and increasing flexibility and circulation. Cold, on the other hand, helps reduce inflammation and dull pain.

Note that because heat and cold are psoriasis triggers for many people who also have psoriasis, you may need to avoid one or the other of these treatments. You know your body best, so choose based on that knowledge.

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Psoriatic Arthritis And Back Pain: What You Need To Know

Psoriatic arthritis is a inflammatory type of arthritis that develops in some people with psoriasis, an autoimmune disease that causes skin cells to build up and form scaly plaques. Psoriasis affects 74 million adults in the United States, and about 30% of patients diagnosed with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis.

Psoriatic arthritis causes inflammation in many joints of the body because the immune system is attacking its own joints. It commonly affects the lumbar spine, or low back.

Points To Remember About Psoriatic Arthritis

7 Things to Avoid if you have Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Psoriatic arthritis causes swelling and pain in joints and the places where tendons and ligaments attach to bones.
  • Most people who get psoriatic arthritis already have the skin disease psoriasis.
  • Although there is no cure for psoriatic arthritis, treatments can slow its progress, lower pain, and protect the joints.
  • You can do things at home to help you live with the condition, such as maintain a healthy weight, do low-impact exercise, and avoid smoking.

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Can I Get Financial Support

Many people worry about what happens if they cannot work or need financial help because of the effects of psoriatic arthritis. Fortunately for many, with good therapy and management the condition can be controlled and allow for a full and active working life. But if you do find that even for a short period of time you are likely to need help, visit the national government websites online. If it is easier, contact your local government or council office, where you should be directed to the appropriate resource and information.

Always consult your doctor or healthcare provider.

This article is adapted from the What is Psoriatic Arthritis? leaflet.

Other leaflets are also available to or order FREE from our shop and include the following:

  • About Us
  • Occupational Therapy and Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Physiotherapy and Exercise: Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Psoriasis and Sensitive Areas
  • Psoriatic Arthritis – Did you know?
  • Psoriatic Arthritis – When to treat?
  • Psoriatic Fatigue
  • Treatments for Psoriasis: An overview
  • Treatments for Psoriatic Arthritis: An overview
  • What is Psoriasis?

Can Psoriatic Arthritis Affect Other Parts Of The Body

Having psoriatic arthritis can put you at risk of developing other conditions and complications around the body.

The chances of getting one of these are rare. But its worth knowing about them and talking to your doctor if you have any concerns.

Eyes

Seek urgent medical attention if one or both of your eyes are red and painful, particularly if you have a change in your vision. You could go to your GP, an eye hospital, or your local A& E department.

These symptoms could be caused by a condition called uveitis, which is also known as iritis. It involves inflammation at the front of the eye.

This can permanently damage your eyesight if left untreated.

Other symptoms are:

  • blurred or cloudy vision
  • sensitivity to light
  • not being able to see things at the side of your field of vision known as a loss of peripheral vision
  • small shapes moving across your field of vision.

These symptoms can come on suddenly, or gradually over a few days. It can affect one or both eyes. It can be treated effectively with steroids.

Heart

Psoriatic arthritis can put you at a slightly higher risk of having a heart condition. You can reduce your risk by:

  • not smoking
  • staying at a healthy weight
  • exercising regularly
  • eating a healthy diet, thats low in fat, sugar and salt
  • not drinking too much alcohol.

These positive lifestyle choices can help to improve your arthritis and skin symptoms.

Talk to your doctor if you have any concerns about your heart health.

Crohns disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Diagnosing And Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    Having a physical exam is the first step to diagnosing and treating PsA. Your physician will talk with you about ongoing symptoms. Let your physician know if you have a family history of PsA, psoriasis or other autoimmune diseases. Your health care provider will also check for tenderness, swelling, limited movement, and skin or nail changes.

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    There is no cure for PsA. But that doesn’t mean you cant manage the disease and have a healthy, active life. You can work with your health care team to find the best treatment for you.

    Treatment varies based on how the disease affects your life, Dr. Jones says. If you have mild symptoms, you may only need treatment during flare-ups. People with severe psoriatic arthritis may need a more aggressive treatment plan to reduce inflammation and improve quality of life.

    Who Is At Risk For Psoriatic Arthritis

    Is psoriasis an autoimmune disease?  Dr. Benji Schreiber

    Psoriasis affects 2-3 percent of the population or approximately 7 million people in the U.S. and up to 30% of these people can develop psoriatic arthritis. Psoriatic arthritis occurs most commonly in adults between the ages of 35 and 55 however, it can develop at any age. Psoriatic arthritis affects men and women equally.

    It is possible to develop psoriatic arthritis with only a family history of psoriasis and while less common, psoriatic arthritis can occur before psoriasis appears. Children of parents with psoriasis are three times more likely to have psoriasis and are at greater risk for developing psoriatic arthritis. The most typical age of juvenile onset is 9-11 years of age.

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    You Feel Pain In Your Heel Every Time You Take A Step

    Psoriatic arthritis also has a tendency to cause inflammation in sites where tendons insert into bones, such as the Achilles tendon at the back of the heel, and the plantar fascia, causing pain in the sole of the foot and bottom of the heel which often will interfere with walking, says Dr. Rosenstein.

    While experts say this isnt the most common psoriatic arthritis symptom, it can make life with this condition even more difficult. If you have heel pain that you cant explain with other reasons , you should get it checked out by a doctor.

    What Is Psoriatic Arthritis

    Psoriatic arthritis is a form of inflammatory arthritis characterized by joint pain, swelling, and morning stiffness. It is associated with having psoriasis or a family history of psoriasis. Both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are chronic autoimmune diseases meaning, conditions in which certain cells of the body attack other cells and tissues of the body.

    Psoriatic arthritis can vary from mild to severe, it can present in the following ways:

    • Oligoarticular, affects four or fewer joints in the body.
    • Polyarticular, affecting four or more joints.
    • Spondylitis, less common and affecting the spine, hips, and shoulders.

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    Half The Battle Is Getting The Right Diagnosis

    Teresa Dishner, 64, a former chemistry teacher from Virginia, saw her primary care doctor after experiencing sudden painful symptoms. I was having extreme pain while getting dressed, and my fingertips bled while teaching class, says Dishner, who was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis in 2002. The doctor initially told her to simply lay off salt. But Dishner had a feeling that something more was amiss, so she decided to see a rheumatologist. Thats how she got the right diagnosis.

    If you suspect theres something behind your pain, dont ignore it and think it will go away, says Renae Rabe, a finance manager living with psoriatic arthritis in West Allis, Wisconsin. She believes she had psoriatic arthritis for at least five years before receiving her diagnosis. Go to your doctor until you get answers, Rabe says.

    Your Energy Level Is Like A Bank Account

    Psoriasis Arthritis Skin Pain Tips and Relief !! B. Zaman Health & Fitness

    Psoriatic arthritis can cause extreme fatigue. For every task you complete, or plan to complete, you drain your daily energy bank. Putting on mascara or talking to a neighbor on the street costs you energy. And sometimes, even if its the first thing you do after waking up, a shower may be all it takes to put you right back in bed.

    Its important to rest when you need to and not push yourself too hard, especially on days when your symptoms are particularly severe, says Joseph Markenson, MD, a rheumatologist at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. Its also important for the loved ones of those who have psoriatic arthritis to understand how draining the condition can be for example, people with psoriatic arthritis may have to cancel plans frequently or head home early.

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    Warning Signs Of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Psoriatic arthritis is a type of arthritis that affects 30% of people with psoriasis, according to the National Psoriasis Foundation. With PsA, your immune system attacks your own body, especially the skin and joints. PsA can mimic other forms of arthritis, such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, says Dr. H. Kevin Jones, FAAOS,, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon at Beaufort Memorial Orthopaedic Specialists. Blood tests can point to other similar conditions and check for signs of inflammation. We can also order X-rays to look for bone and joint changes.

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    The Effects Of Psoriatic Arthritis On The Body

    PsA is an autoimmune disorder that causes the immune system to attack healthy parts of the body, mostly the skin and the joints.

    This causes pain, stiffness, and swelling in the joints, either singly or throughout the body. Early treatment is essential to avoid long-term joint and tissue deterioration.

    Psoriatic arthritis usually develops within 10 years of developing psoriasis. Skin psoriasis causes flare-ups of red, patchy skin that can occur anywhere on the body.

    According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, about 30 percent of people with psoriasis eventually develop PsA.

    In some cases, PsA is diagnosed before you have skin psoriasis because the arthritic symptoms might be more noticeable.

    Its also possible to develop PsA without having psoriasis, especially if you have a family history of psoriasis. Both skin psoriasis and inflammatory types of arthritis are considered autoimmune disorders.

    PsA is a chronic, or long-term, condition. Anyone can get it, but its most common between ages 30 and 50 years. Since theres no cure, treatment is aimed at managing symptoms and preventing permanent joint damage.

    Research theorizes that genetics play a part in the development of psoriatic arthritis. Scientists are trying to find out which genes are involved. Identifying the genes may allow the development of gene therapy treatment.

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    How Psoriatic Arthritis Treatment Prevents Disease Progression

    The primary way to slow the progression of PsA is through medications that modify the immune system. It may take trial and error to find the treatment that works best for a given patient, notes Dr. Haberman. While we have a lot of medication options for PsA, we dont know which ones a patient will respond to, so sometimes we need to try more than one medication to find the one thats right for that patient, she says.

    In addition, medications that have been effective for you can stop working over time. If this happens, your doctor may recommend a medication that works differently say, targets a different part of the immune system to control disease activity.

    There are many drugs used to treat PsA. The ones that you will use will depend on the type and severity of symptoms as well as the most problematic areas .

    Medications use to treat PsA include:

    What Causes Psoriatic Arthritis

    Pin on About Plantar Fasciitis

    Psoriatic arthritis can happen when your immune system overacts and causes problems. Doctors know that certain factors may trigger your immune system, causing the disease. These factors include:

    • Genes: Many people who get psoriatic arthritis have a family history of the disease.
    • Environment: Some factors may trigger the disease, such as:
    • Obesity

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    How Do I Know If Its Psoriatic Arthritis

    Diagnosing hip PsA may be challenging at first. This is because joint pain and swelling arent unique to PsA. These symptoms may also be seen in rheumatoid arthritis , lupus, osteoarthritis , ankylosing spondylitis, and conditions with inflammatory arthritis.

    While you shouldnt self-diagnose PsA of the hip, there are some key signs that differentiate this condition from other types of arthritis. For example, hip PsA may cause pain around the buttocks, groin, and outer thigh, while hip OA primarily affects the groin and the frontof the thigh.

    Other conditions that can lead to hip pain may include muscle strains and stress fractures. A dislocated hip may occur from a recent accident or injury.

    A doctor can help you determine whether your hip pain is attributed to PsA, another autoimmune disease, or a different condition entirely. They may also refer you to a rheumatologist, a specialist trained in diagnosing and treating autoimmune diseases of the joints, bones, and muscles.

    While theres no single test to diagnose PsA, a healthcare professional may help identify this condition based on the following criteria:

    • your personal health history, including any infections or injuries
    • symptoms of psoriasis and/or PsA
    • a family history of psoriasis, PsA, or any other autoimmune conditions
    • imaging tests, such as ultrasounds or MRIs
    • blood tests to rule out other conditions

    What Are The Treatment Options For Psoriatic Arthritis

    The aim of treatment for psoriatic arthritis is to control the disease and relieve symptoms. Treatment may include any combination of the following:

    Choice of medications depends on disease severity, number of joints involved, and associated skin symptoms. During the early stages of the disease, mild inflammation may respond to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs . Cortisone injections may be used to treat ongoing inflammation in a single joint. Oral steroids, if used to treat a psoriatic arthritis flare, can temporarily worsen psoriasis. Long-term use of oral steroids should be avoided when possible due to the negative effects on the body over time.

    DMARDs are used when NSAIDs fail to work and for patients with persistent and/or erosive disease. DMARDs that are effective in treating psoriatic arthritis include: methotrexate, sulfasalazine, and cyclosporine.

    Biologic agents are an important consideration when disease control is not being achieved with NSAIDS or DMARDs. Biologics have been utilized for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis since 2005 and are highly effective at slowing and preventing progression of joint damage. Your healthcare provider will complete additional laboratory tests and review safety considerations before initiating a medication regimen. Gaining good control of psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis is important to avoid increased systemic risks, particularly heart disease.

    Exercise

    Heat and cold therapy

    Splinting

    Surgery

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